Route 2: Dodecanese Greek islands

 

The Dodecanese (Twelve Islands or Dodekanes) is the most southerly group of islands in the Southern Sporades, lying off the south-west coast of Asia Minor, located just a couple of kilometers from Turkey- It includes the 14 larger islands of Lipsi, Patmos, Leros, Kalymnos, Kos, Astypalea, Nisyros, Symi, Tilos, Rhodes, Khalki, Karpathos and Kasos, together with some smaller islets and rocks.

 

 

Option A - 7 days
Marmaris-Rodi-Chalki-Symi-Tilos -Knidos - Marmaris-Rodi-Chalki-Symi-Tilos -Knidos
Option B - 14 days
Marmaris-Rodi-Chalki-Symi-Tilos - Nissyros Marmaris-Rodi-Chalki-Symi-Tilos - Nissyros - Knidos-Datca- Golfo di Hisaronu- Loryma - Marmairs


The Dodecanese (Twelve Islands or Dodekanes) is the most southerly group of islands in the Southern Sporades, lying off the south-west coast of Asia Minor, located just a couple of kilometers from Turkey- It includes the 14 larger islands of Lipsi, Patmos, Leros, Kalymnos, Kos, Astypalea, Nisyros, Symi, Tilos, Rhodes, Khalki, Karpathos and Kasos, together with some smaller islets and rocks.

Rhodes Town, Greece. Rhodes, the largest of the Dodecanese and the fourth largest Greek island (after Crete, Euboea and Lesbos), is a favourite port when visiting the south east of Greece , one hour by hydrofoil from Marmaris and 90 minutes from Fethiye. The island is roughly ellipsoid or diamond-shaped and a mountainous range runs from north to south with the highest peak Mt Ataviros (1205 m), situated in the middle of the west coast. Unlike many of the other islands in this region, Rhodes is fertile not only in the valleys but also on the higher slopes: pine, orange, olive, lemon, fig and pear trees thrive in these conditions. Also the villages are lush and colourful with hibiscus, jasmine and bougainvillea, which explains the many butterflies. And indeed, Rhodes is often called the butterfly island. Port of Entry.

Symi, Greece. Having put into 248 Greek islands, this one, twenty-four sailing miles from Rhodes Town, is among the more striking. Simi Town has a special charm with neo-classical homes of long-gone sea captains climbing steep harbor slopes. From the heights above Simi Town see the straits in which the Spartan fleet in 411 BC trapped the Athenian fleet, beginning a six-year decline in Athenian maritime dominance culminating in final defeat at Aegospotami in the Hellespont (Dardanelles). From ancient times the fortunes of Symi were closely linked with those of Rhodes. The island was occupied by the Turks in 1523 and after the Balkan War of 1912 was held by Italy. It was reunited with Greece in 1947.
See as well remains of the monument (tropaion) erected to celebrate the local victory (just beyond the last windmill). In Simi Town they do more with Greek cuisine than on other islands, especially at Meraklis one block south of the harbor. Port of Entry.

Tilos, Greece. Ten sailing miles after Symi. A delightful hearkening back to what Greek islands were like before discovery by tourists. See the ancient and medieval acropolis above Megalo Khorio. It hosts one of seven castles on the island. See as well the fossilized bones of pleistocene dwarf elephants (when Tilos became an island six million years ago, resident mastodons devolved on lesser fare into dwarf elephants) unearthed at Harcadio. Taverna Armenon on the beach at Livadhia is superior.

Nisiros, Greece. Nineteen sailing miles from Tilos , Nisiros is a volcanic cousin to the more-visited Santorini, last erupting 25 thousand years ago. Its verdant exterior and quaint rim-villages mask a crater floor nevertheless still bubbling in places. Thick-soled shoes are recommended, as is a visit to the Doric acropolis circa fifth century BC. Amiable chatter and good cooking at Taverna Mikes in Mandraki.

Kos, Greece. A twenty sailing miles from Nisiros, Kos lays at the mouth of the Turkish Gulf of Kerme, which cuts deep into the coast of Asia Minor. It was separated from the Bodrum Peninsula by the collapse of a rift valley in the Pliocene period, which explains the range of limestone hills, rising to 846 m in Mount Dikaios, that runs along the island for almost its entire length. It is the largest island in the Dodecanese after Rhodes. Its beaches and inland treks popular with Cleopatra. It is also the birthplace of Hippocrates. The Temple of Asclepion (school of medicine) founded in his memory is a must see, while the Hospitaller fortress and ancient agora are also enlightening. Port of Entry bounded by hibiscus and rose laurel. Fine dining on the beach at Taverna Spitaki 200 meters east of Kos Island Marina.

Pserimos, Greece. is notable for home-grown olives, capers, a 2nd century AD Temple of Aphrodite commissioned by Hermias, son of Emperor Marcus Aurelius, and a sandy beach which in season is wall to wall oiled bodies. Best visited in April and October.

Leros, Greece is the island which headquarteredthe Italian Navy after it wrested the Dodecanese from Turkey in 1912, beginning thirty-one years of occupation. It is also an island where real property passes from mother to daughter and where local Greek men are suppliants only. A nice change of venue with a Knights castle, charming byways, and fine dining at Taverna Psarapoula in Pandeli.

Patmos, Greece. A short ten-mile sail on the wind from Arki, Patmos is the sacred (320 churches for 2700 residents) island to which St. John the Divine was banished from Ephesus by Emperor Domitian in AD 95 and on which he dictated the Apocalypse. It is also an island with striking views, cloistered byways, and sand beaches willingly shared by resident ducks and geese. As for dining, well, Taverna Agora in Chora just below the monastery offers superb octopus in vinegar. Lipsi, Greece. A ten mile island hop off the wind from Patmos, Lipsi is presumed by some to be the island on which Odysseus was shipwrecked returning from Troy and where he was seduced by the siren Calypso. One or the other, the island or Calypso, charmed him for seven years. Today Lipsi's beaches are the principal attraction, though the local wine and fresh sea food are also sirens. As for dining, try Taverna Calypso and ask for papa's marinated mackerel

Lipsi, Greece. A ten mile island hop off the wind from Patmos, Lipsi is presumed by some to be the island on which Odysseus was shipwrecked returning from Troy and where he was seduced by the siren Calypso. One or the other, the island or Calypso, charmed him for seven years. Today Lipsi's beaches are the principal attraction, though the local wine and fresh sea food are also sirens. As for dining, try Taverna Calypso and ask for papa's marinated mackerel.

 

 

Croatia Sailing Holidays


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Croatia Sailing Holidays


  Miminac 6, 22000 Šibenik, Croatia

  +385 (0)98 706 308

  info@croatia-sailingholidays.com

  booking@croatia-sailingholidays.com

  Mon - Fri: 08-22h / Sat: 08-15 h

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